Photo
Photo

(Source: fuskida, via missgracejones)

Photo

Madonna del Magnificat (detail), Botticelli, 1481

Madonna del Magnificat (detail), Botticelli, 1481

(Source: sforzinda, via darksilenceinsuburbia)

Photo
blackbirdspots:

Hans Holbein the Elder -  Porträt der Katharina Schwarz mit den Attributen ihrer Nahmensheiligen

blackbirdspots:

Hans Holbein the Elder -  Porträt der Katharina Schwarz mit den Attributen ihrer Nahmensheiligen

(via vasilyt)

Photoset

ted:

Each of these plants is over 2,000 years old. 

Rachel Sussman is on a quest to celebrate the resilience of life by identifying and photographing the world’s oldest continuous-living organisms. The plants you see above, from top to bottom:

1. Jomon Sugi, Japanese Cedar (2,180 to 7,000 years old, Yaku Shima, Japan)

2. Clonal Mojave Yucca (12,000+ years old, Mojave Desert, California)

3. La Llareta (3,000 years old, Atacama Desert, Chile) 

4. Pando, Clonal Quaking Aspen (80,000 years old, Fish Lake, Utah)

5. Welwitschia Mirabilis (2,000 years old, Namib Naukluft Desert, Namibia)

6. Sagole Baobab (2,000 years  old, Limpopo Province, South Africa)

7. Spruce Gran Picea (9,550 years old, Fulufjället, Sweden)

Watch her talk here »

Photo
jinyeong:

(by laney)

jinyeong:

(by laney)

(Source: eggnim, via nipponia-nippon)

Photo
wandering-in-wonder:

Temo il silenzio della notte.
* * *
Edmund Dulac, Edgar Allan Poe Illustrations - To Helen Two

wandering-in-wonder:

Temo il silenzio della notte.

* * *

Edmund Dulac, Edgar Allan Poe Illustrations - To Helen Two

(via vasilyt)

Photo

(Source: valentinovamp, via mudwerks)

Photo
saisonciel:

Kathryn Perry by Ira L. Hill, c. 1920

saisonciel:

Kathryn Perry by Ira L. Hill, c. 1920

Photoset

thephotographerssociety:

odditiesoflife:

This 3200 Year Old Tree is So Massive, It’s Never Been Captured in a Single Image…Until Now

It takes a special kind of tree to have a nickname like “The President”. The giant sequoia stands 247 feet tall and is an estimated 3,200 years old. The trunk measures 27 feet across and, between the base and the highest peak, there are an estimated two billion needles.

Until now, the tree had never been photographed in its entirety. A team of photographers from National Geographic worked with scientists from California’s Sequoia National Park to try to be the first.

It took an intricate set of pulleys and levers to scale the tree, which one scientist argues is the largest in the world (if you take into account width). After stitching together 126 separate photos, we are left with this mind-blowing portrait of “The President” captured in a single photo for the first time.

Photography Digest

(Source: distractify.com)